Mallerstang and Wild Boar Fell (part 1)

If Wordsworth wanted to ‘wander lonely as a cloud’ he’d be hard-pressed to manage it in the Lake District these days. A much better option would be to head to the far Eastern edge of Cumbria, in a place which is partly in the Yorkshire Dales National Park.
The valley of Mallerstang is North East of Sedbergh, East of the Howgill fells and South of Kirkby Stephen. It is bordered by rugged fells and contains at least two ruined castles. There are suprisingly few visitors, despite it being clearly marked on Ordnance Survey maps and not requiring teleportation to reach it. It has a train line and everything.

 

Ed fieldsEdward and I took took the train from Shipley at around 11am on Friday morning. By 12.30 we were in Kirkby Stephen at the Northern end of Mallerstang. We shouldered our packs, checked the maps and set off. Within 5 minutes Edward had stumbled, unused to carrying a pack. I removed some of the gear from his pack into mine and we were off again. We headed East towards the River Eden which flows through the valley, aiming to follow it towards Pendragon Castle.

The going was very easy, footpaths marked on the map were either farm tracks or trails of discoloured grass across fields.

 

Lammerside castleAfter a short while we came across the ruins of a castle that I’d not noticed on the map, Lammerside Castle. We had a poke about inside it -as had several sheep from the look of it. A few photos later we continued south towards Pendragon Castle which was doing a good job of not being seen. We arrived at the castle to see several signs declaring it closed for repairs and there was no access to it. Oh well, best get onto the fells then.

 

We retraced our steps a little way and began to climb up the valley side towards Wild Boar Fell. A farmer fixing his dry stone wall would be the last person we’d see until late the next afternoon.

 

The views around the valley were very good, nothing to dramatic or awe-inspiring, just good hill and moorland country, unspoiled by heavily worn paths or herds of walkers. The ground showed very little sign of walkers ever being there in the first place. As we ascended towards Little Fell (559m) and High Dolphinsty Edward began to tire. He’d not uttered a word of complaint so far despite walking for several hours and carrying a load of about 3kg. “Almost there” I said. Countless times. “Just a bit farther…”. The ground began to steepen as we climbed towards a rocky promontory called The Nab. It was a sharp rocky edge with steep cliffs below it -quite a different character to the rolling grassland we’d travelled across so far.

The nab

Our destination was a wild camp at Sand Tarn a little way to the West and below the summit of the Nab. We turned towards the trig point of Wild Boar Fell, every step Edward was getting more tired and a little grumpy. Immediately after passing the trig point the ground falls away and the tarn is clear to see. This had an amazing effect on Edward who was all of a sudden recharged and ready to go. We got down to the lake in no time and he’d already chosen a spot for our tent. Throughout the day we’d discussed what makes a good place for your tent (not a swamp, flat, not in the strong wind, good views). The tent was pitched a couple of metres from the lake shore close to the sandy beach at the end. As soon as the tent was up Ed was off circumnavigating the lake, all tiredness forgotten.

Sand tarnSand tarn campSand tarn beach

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About lordyosch

Dad, Husband, School teacher

Posted on June 1, 2014, in Backpacking, children and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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